Tag Archives: #Grief

Good Gifts #2

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It would be nice if the grief journey were over, wouldn’t it?  Sadly, this is not the case.  In many ways, it is just getting going.  We all survived the Easter holiday but it was not the same without our Radish.  MCVWasHere and I managed to grill a butterflied leg of lamb, thereby making our mother proud from her heavenly perch.  I am pretty sure we screwed it up but it was tasty nonetheless.  Severe holiday let down set in on Monday  with family returning to The Other Coast.   After the shock has worn off, the active MISSING phase begins ninety days in.  Man, would Grandmere have delighted in the peas, carrots, and Easter Egg hunt …

Perhaps to prep me for this, a galaxy of friends sent me a gift every day.  EVERY DAY OF HOLY WEEK I RECEIVED A GIFT.  Surprise!  It was not Christmas but it sure felt like it.  And to think that this was not coordinated by friends, only two of whom know each other.

On Monday, a box arrived with four wrapped gifts and a note from one of my DF Chicks, MLD, a needlepointing and reading maven.  She was also my Heart Surgery Coach.  Thinking I would need these gifts later, I hoarded them for Sunday.  I confess to feeling through the paper – they felt like books.

On Tuesday, a flat package arrived from Martita, another DF Chick, and Thing 3’s godmother.  This I ripped open, thinking it was an Easter card.  Instead, it was gorgeous watercolor painting of a bunch of radishes, an article on them, and a long lovely letter of a personal nature on what grief for one’s mother looks like after twenty years.  I never met Martita’s mother but I still quote her:  “If they [gossips] are talking about you, that means they are giving some other poor soul a rest.” Although Martita and MLD are good friends, I do not think these gifts were a coordinated effort.  My sister MCVWasHere also gave me a Glassybaby, a pink “goodness” votive for my burgeoning Radish altar.  This was not actually a gift – it was for winning a round of the High Stakes License Plate Game – but since I’d forgotten about it, it still counts!

When Wednesday rolled around, I opened a package from Amazon, thinking Mr. Understanding had ordered yet another guitar instruction video.  But lo and behold, it was another book, this one a gift from Ms. Broccoli.  Called Designing Your Life – How to Build a Well-Loved, Joyful Life by Bill Burnett and Dave Evans, it is a Stanford University design class on how to create a life you actually enjoy living, the perfect gift for a family in flux.  Think “encore career”, or for me, middle aged starter career.

After three amazing gifts in three consecutive days, it dawned on me that the Universe was sending me a big fat message of LOVE.

But wait!  There’s more!  It’s almost embarrassing.  Almost.  I am just trying to make a point here.  Wait for it.

On Thursday, MCV handed me and my father each a gift from her college friend, Michelle.  This one makes me cry when writing about it – a beautiful compilation of Sally’s musings, photos, and recipes from her blog CookSallyCook.com.  Curated and organized with a table of contents, I was awestruck  by this gift.  Michelle and Sally had bonded over the ancient grain einkorn.   Who knew???  An heirloom, both the grain and the book.  Earlier in the day a Jackson & Perkins bulb garden arrived from Dr. Skin.  Bloom where you are planted.

Moving on to Good Friday:  a hand knitted, lacy, rainbow pastel prayer shawl from MoodRingMomma.  I do not know how my sister had the mental band width to create such an intricate gift.  I had been using a prayer shawl of Sally’s given to her by the women of the church.  It was toasty warm but I confess to finding the colors not to my liking, even thoughI did get in the habit of putting it on.  Another heart wrenching heirloom, imbued with tears.

On Saturday, MCV gave me a blue Glassybaby cocktail drinker (“splash”), another premio for winning a second round of The High Stakes License Plate game.  My in-laws sent a bento box tower of nuts, which I put in Mr. Understanding’s Easter Basket.  Mine, as you can see, was full.

On Easter Sunday, MCV returned to my Children’s Bible Stories,  given to me and inscribed by my Grandmarie on Easter, 1971.  She also gave me Anne Lamott’s latest and greatest book Hallelujah Anyway.

On Monday, feeling bereft (which is just pitiful), I opened all of MLD’s gifts:  semi-cerebral brain candy* and a Mexican angel ornament that doubles as a nativity scene which went directly to the makeshift altar.   In the middle of my pity party, I took a nap and while I was dozing, the postman delivered a box of gifts from KT:  a key chain with Phillippians 4:4 on it (REJOICE!), a new CD by Olivia Newton John and friends called Liv On,  some paper goods from Magnolia,  and a favorite hymn printed on pink paper.  I actually knew the words.

I still cannot believe it.  Can you?

And then today:  a signed contract for the sale of our house in Ohio.  Cranky me, it seemed like another loss, the closing of yet another chapter.  Punto final.  Until Thing 2 said to me, “What if it’s an Easter gift?”  Indeed.  He did not know about all of the other ones …

So what do you think the cosmic message is, sent by a phalanx of Easter angels?  Here is my best guess:  READ.  FEED YOUR SOUL.  High brow, low brow, non-fiction, fiction, the Bible in adult and children’s versions.  Go to the beach and design your life.  Plant seeds.  Eat ancient grains and nuts.  Drink a cocktail out of a handcrafted colored glass and savor it.  Light a candle.  Say a prayer for your friends and for the world; wear an heirloom made with love while you do it.  SING!  OUT LOUD!    Frame all those extraordinary radishes and hang them where you can see them every day.  Have mercy on dear Anne Lamott and make your peace with her she’d meet you at the beach and chat with you about Jesus.  Miss your mother fiercely but remember she is in The Best Place, hanging out with the Mother of all Mothers, REJOICING.  She sent a cadre of love language speaking friends and family to remind you of the power of Resurrection, the unlikely gift of an empty tomb.

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*MLD’s book choices to lighten the heart of the Expat Princess:

Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Sanders

Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney

Enchanted August by Brenda Bowen

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Chastised

Thing 3 reminded me today, when I mentioned that I did not have to blog on a daily basis any longer, that the object of Lent was to CONTINUE one’s Lenten practice.  And to think she wasn’t paying attention!

Humbled.

Zero promises.

Today I was humbled by LaLopez’s comment on Last Words.  Let’s send up some love to Leona, her mother.   Each “grief journey” is unique and yet global.  Once you have been on one, you “get” it a lot more.  As an unknown wise person once said, “You don’t know what you don’t know.”  LaLopez, by “cosmic coincidence” (her words) became Thing 2’s Other Mother.  A friendship to cherish.

God bless and good night.  MCVWasHere is Here.  REJOICE!  

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Last Words

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Photo Credit:  Sally Calligan

Dear Readers,

Thank you all so much for your patience with me and my “grief journey”.  Even after 40 days, it is not over.   Perhaps I just have a better appreciation of what one really entails.  Lent officially ends on Maundy Thursday but I am ending this sojourn after 40 days in the wilderness.  I prayed, at the beginning and every day, for it to be a Spirit filled 40 days.  Here I will confess that sometimes I truly had no idea who was writing the words or where the idea came from.  Sometimes I just posted a picture because that was all I could do. Grief can make one positively paralytic, as my house attests.  So again, thank you for reading and bearing with me.  I have taken most of you along on a trip you were not intending to take.

Today when I sat down in the church pew for Palm Sunday, I had the perspicacity to ask my mother (something I rarely do) to send me a little sign that she was with me, Thing 3, and my dad in church.  Thirty seconds later, the organist played the most beautiful instrumental rendition of Jesus Loves Me, one of the two hymns my mother requested at her funeral.  Ah, confirmation.  Thank you, Jesus.  I love you too.

Recently, Rick Warren had a podcast series called the The Seven Greatest Words of Love.  I usually binge listen to Rick while I clean the house or drive in the car.  During several of the above noted  podcasts, he spoke about a classic children’s night time prayer and Jesus’s dying last words.  In the last 3 months I had thought about the 18th Century bedtime prayer I myself said as a child every night.  Here it is:

Now I lay me down to sleep,
I pray the Lord my soul to keep.
If I should die before I wake,
I pray the Lord my soul to take.

A less troubling version for kids is:
Now I lay me down to sleep,
I pray the Lord my soul to keep,
Watch and guard me through the night,
and wake me with the morning light.

One of my favorite bedtime prayers  is found in the Book of Common Prayer (p. 134):

Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or weep this night, and give your angels charge over those who sleep.  Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless the dying, soothes the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the joyous; and all for your love’s sake.  Amen.

I confess, however, that I did not give any thought to my own mother’s last words until Rick Warren was talking about Jesus’.  And that has given me tremendous pause for thought.  What were my mother’s last words?  I am going with, “Good night, darling. It’s been a marvelous day.”   My father might be able to remember.  What were Sally’s last thoughts?  I am sure she said a prayer of thanksgiving; maybe she also wondered if she’d taken her medicine, if there was yogurt to eat for breakfast in the morning, where did she put her damn reading glasses???

Because my mother Sally died in her sleep, her family members are left with a few mysteries.  Some of these, friends and family have cleared up.  There is no explanation for where she put somethings in her kitchen.  Still.  One thing I am certain of:  angels were encamping around her sleeping form, twelve legions of them if need be.

It is finished.  My mother committed her own spirit to the Lord and I know she was well  received.  Amen and Happy Easter!  REJOICE.

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Bereft

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Photo Credit:  Sally Calligan

Daily I conjure my mother just to let her go.   The latter is impossible.  Today marks two months since her passing.  Her photo sums up the way I feel.

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Good Grief!

A cheater post.  An article shared by Mrs. NATO on the grieving process.  Today, for a variety of reasons, it became apparent that many people can benefit from this interview in The Guardian of British psychotherapist Julia Samuel, if they are brave enough to read it.  Dr. Samuel was discussing her new book, Grief Works.  Among other things, it tells one how to behave in the presence of someone else’s grief. It illuminated how short of the mark I have fallen when others have lost an enormously special person in their lives.  Consider this a primer on compassionate consideration of others – what to do, what to say.  I am pointing the finger at myself, FYI.  Sally would want me to do some self-examination.  Print it out and put it next to the obituary you have written about yourself.

So when I fell apart during yoga class this morning,  in the savasana (corpse) pose no less,  to the accompanying acoustic rendition by Lotte Kestner of Beyonce’s  Halo, I let the grief just roll out of me.   I recovered, my face red, puffy, and sweaty.  Then I got in the car and fell apart ten minutes later to Luke Bryan‘s song Fast.  Listen and weep on iTunes.

Later in the day, Thing 1 told me about meeting physician and author Dr. Atul Gawande at a talk he was giving today at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.  Dr. Gawande wrote the most important book I read last year, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters Most in the End.  Thing 1 was starstruck, gobsmacked, and tongue tied.  Dr. Gawande spoke on the topic of Generalists vs. Specialists in the medical profession.  His case study was a man who had lived with a 40 year migraine which was eventually healed.  CAN YOU IMAGINE???  Amen and amen.  Nine months was more than enough for all of us.  Yet Sally and the Holy Spirit were working overtime to bring Thing 1 a message of love, hope, and purpose.  Can’t you see Sally’s  halo shining?

Mama said there’d be days like this.

 

 

 

 

 

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